Browsing 1986 Australian Cotton Conference by Issue Date

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  • Constable, G.A. (1986-08-20)
    Several factors influence the nitrogen demands of a cotton crop and the ability of the soil and fertiliser to satisfy these demands. Some of these factors (eg weather) are beyond the control of a cotton grower. One of the ...
  • Constable, G.A.; Rochester, I.J.; Cook, J.B. (1986-08-20)
    Questions are often raised about whether trace elements are required on cotton. Zinc deficiency has been confirmed in areas where topsoil has been removed, and zinc application is common in many areas, despite a lack of ...
  • Holland, Hugh (1986-08-20)
    Answers to the questions : How do I find and use probes for scheduling irrigations? Are they used as the only scheduling tool? How do we use our water most effectively? Identification of end points; (Field Capacity and ...
  • Hodgson, A.S. (1986-08-20)
    Each furrow irrigation waterlogs most of the root zone of cotton in cracking clay soils. This deprives the roots of oxygen, they take up less water and nutrients. and this reduces growth and yield. Recent research at ...
  • Keefer, G.D. (1986-08-20)
    This project was prompted by disappointingly low cotton yields at Emerald and other Central Queensland centres. The aims of the project are to provide a basis for sound irrigation management of cotton through studies of ( ...
  • HOUGHTON, DICK (1986-08-20)
    Firstly, it is important to define "Minimum Tillage" as it applies to our operation. Our objective in achieving such a system is more correctly described as a "Permanent Bed'' system i.e. we have totally directed our efforts ...
  • Forrester, N.W. (1986-08-20)
    The threat of resistance has been realised, and no doubt will continue to be realised in the future. What then is the cost once resistance has developed?
  • Fay, M.F. (1986-08-20)
    If research gaps exist, we are all at fault. If researchers are thought of as 'being in their own little world', it is a ref lection of poor communication efforts on the part of producers and advisors. I f growers and ...
  • Emerald Consultants (1986-08-20)
    We believe the success of the modern cotton farmer is becoming more dependent upon his being made aware of, selecting and implementing appropriate research and new technology. This requires a strong link between researcher ...
  • Daniells, Ian (1986-08-20)
    Throughout this article I will be encouraging less tillage. There are three reasons for this. Firstly, tillage is costly. Secondly, soil structure often is sufficiently good for farming without tillage. Thirdly, soil ...
  • Brown, Geoff (1986-08-20)
    The need to develop marketing strategies for the Australian cotton crop appears to be imperative. If we are to continue to develop nev.1 cotton varieties. lt is essential to be able to place these into the market profitably. ...
  • St George Consultants (1986-08-20)
    The presentation hereunder is a collation of views of consultants from the Darling Downs and the St George regions. The following points will be considered: (a) Are research needs being addressed by researchers? (b) If so ...
  • Pickering, John (1986-08-20)
    On many occasions, we saw some parts of our farm, produce this 3 bale yield, but not over a whole field. One corner ,or one side, or a top or bottom end, but not all over. There is not good value in growing 3 bales in one ...
  • Teakle, R.E. (1986-08-20)
    Factors which influence the efficacy of an NPV application These include: (i) the initial actjvity of the virus preparation, distribution (.i.i) lts rate or application and distribution on the crop, (Jji) Its persistence ...
  • Pyke, B.A.; Rice, M.J.; Sabine, B.N.E.; Zalucki, M.P. (1986-08-20)
    The Push Pull Strategy (P.P.S.) is a method of sensory manipulation of pest insects originated at the University of Queensland. It proposes to manage the behaviour of pests by making their food less palatable with allomones ...
  • Twi, ne, P.H. (1986-08-20)
    In the era of nearly total reliance on pesticides, there was general disregard of the fact that even the simplest agroecosystem presents a complicated maze or delicately balanced ecological interactions.
  • Walker, , P.W.; Harris, V.E. (1986-08-20)
    Traps baited with sex attractants ( 1 pheromone 1 traps) are presently being used by a number of farmers in Central Queensland to monitor P. scutigera populations and for timing insecticide sprays. However, there is ...
  • Scholz, B.C. (1986-08-20)
    Egg parasites of the genus Trichogramma arH used to control lepidopterous pests throughout the world (Stinner, 1977). These small parasitic wasps are released in large numbers (e.g. 100,000/ha) to oviposit in Heliothis ...
  • Rice, Martin (1986-08-20)
    A very serious situation faces growers due to increasing insecticide resistance, the fall-off in development of new chemicals and the rising costs of insecticides from overseas. This is fueling a renewed interest in the ...
  • Hearn, A.B. (1986-08-20)
    Greg Constable and I have previously shown that in the Namoi Valley an irrigation water supply of 8 ML per ha is needed to obtain maximum yields in the driest years. In most years however, because there is more rain, less ...

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