Browsing 1988 Australian Cotton Conference by Issue Date

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  • Hulme, P.J.; MacLeod, D.A.; McKenzie, D.C.; Anthony, D.A. (1988-08-17)
    The presence of right-angle bending in cotton tap roots clearly shows the restrictions which degradation of soil structure imposes on cotton growth. The obvious solution to this problem is to break up degraded layers by ...
  • Ward, W.T.; McTainsh, G.H.; McGarry, D. (1988-08-17)
    This paper address why there are differences in the soils of the lower Namoi Valley. At present it is commonly accepted that there is little variation in the heavy day soils west of Narrabri because they have formed from ...
  • Kirchhof, G.; Schafer, B.M.; So, H.B. (1988-08-17)
    To investigate soil response to compaction, a range of cracking clay soils (Vertisols) were collected from major cotton growing areas in Queensland and subjected to a uni-axial-compression. Large differences in ...
  • Harden, John; Woods, , Nicholas (1988-08-17)
    The successful application of Agrochemicals involves an understanding of the:- target, product, equipment, droplet behaviour, and the environment.
  • Mcintyre, Geoff (1988-08-17)
    Irrigation scheduling in cotton using the water balance program WATERSCHED has been the subject of an extension development project in Queensland for two years. The project is funded by Cotton Research Council.
  • BROWNE, R.S. (1988-08-17)
    Chemical Farming implies the use of chemicals for the control of insects, weeds and diseases. In this paper, I want to deal with the use of herbicides in cotton that can be used with, or as a substitute mechanical cultivation. ...
  • Kirby, J.M. (1988-08-17)
    It rained a lot, and much cotton was picked on wet soil - but how much damage was, or will be, done to the soil? It is worth bearing in mind the description given in the handbook on Soil Management by Davies et al. (1977 ...
  • Fletcher, Mostyn (1988-08-17)
    This can cover an enormous area because not only does technology intrude into every aspect of growing a crop, by the view of it can change drastically with each different farmer. Compare a man establishing himself on ...
  • Vance, Peter (1988-08-17)
    Irrigation trials have been conducted at Byee over the last two seasons as part of a Statewide project funded by the Cotton Research Council.
  • Llewellyn, D.J.; Lyon, B.; Cousins, Y.; Huppatz, J.; Dennis, E.S.; Peacock, W.J. (1988-08-17)
    Genetic engineering involves the agronomic improvement of crop plants through the introduction of new genetic information (genes) originating from other organisms. Unlike traditional plant breeding, this is not restricted ...
  • Smith, David F. (1988-08-17)
    Your committee has asked me particularly to focus on the technological needs of the industry. As a background to this it's worth talking briefly about the research councils and their evolution.
  • Duxbury, T. (1988-08-17)
    Most herbicides are complex molecules and their decomposition often requires several different chemical conversions, each mediated by a variety of organisms. Until now the detailed investigation of the ecology of such ...
  • McRae, Cheryl F.; Auld, Bruce A. (1988-08-17)
    The fungus Colletotrichum orbiculare(Berk. et Mont.) v. Arx (Walker and Nikandrow, unpublished data) was found causing anthracnose on X. spinosum in several locations during a survey in south eastern Australia in ...
  • Fay, M.F. (1988-08-17)
    I have to tell you now that I will not be presenting such a perspective. In fact I will tend, in my address, to highlight some areas associated with consultancy and agronomy, where an increase in technology seems to be the ...
  • Blows, David (1988-08-17)
    To the question "Can nutrition affect earliness?" the answer must be a definite Wes". Further, it will be just as important a factor as irrigation or pest management. Correct nutrition will form the basis of any attempt ...
  • Corish, Peter (1988-08-17)
    As the first presentation on this topic I would like to very briefly outline the major advantages of producing an early crop.
  • Warden, Steve (1988-08-17)
    From before the first seed is planted, everything that 1s done, 1.e. selection of seed variety, to all cultural practices and 1nsect control must have one aim and that is earliness. There are three main cultural practices ...
  • Pyke, Bruce (1988-08-17)
    It was once a commonly held belief in central Queensland that, because the potential cotton growing season was a long one, earliness was not an important management consideration. Such a belief is now very much a minority ...
  • Holland, Hugh (1988-08-17)
    Pest management is only one link in the cotton management chain. To produce an early crop it is essential that all links in that chain be securely welded together.
  • Fitt, Gary P.; Daly, Joanne C. (1988-08-17)
    As major pests of cotton production, Heliothis spp. are of most concern to growers during the summer when they are active and damaging crops. Once autumn arrives and the crop is picked, Heliothis are soon forgotten. But ...

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