1992 Australian Cotton Conference

 

Recent Submissions

  • Nehl, D.B.; Brown, J.F. (1992-08-11)
    Question: When is a cotton plant not a cotton plant? Answer: All the time. Healthy cotton plants are always part of a mycorrhiza.
  • Allen, Stephen (1992-08-11)
    Verticillium wilt of cotton is caused by a fungus (Verticillium dahliae) that infects the host plant via the roots and colonises the vascular system. Symptoms therefore include a brown discoloration of the vascular tissue ...
  • Harden, G. (1992-08-11)
    A widespread problem of premature defoliation and physiological cut out of cotton has occurred in the Emerald Irrigation Area since the early 1980s. The problem was particularly severe in 1988 and 1989. This premature ...
  • Mcintyre, Geoff; Marshall, John (1992-08-11)
    Documentation of crop yields and varieties in the Toowoomba Royal Agricultural Show Irrigated Crops Competition since 1972 demonstrates the great advances achieved by cotton breeders as new varieties have been introduced ...
  • Wells, Tony (1992-08-11)
    During the 1990-91 and 1991-92 seasons planting date experiments were carried out at Narrabri Agricultural Research Station using a range of cotton varieties. These experiments form part of an on-going program to investigate ...
  • Smith, Bob; Gourlay, Andrew (1992-08-11)
    Encouraged by a trial 1/2 acre result of 2.8 bales per acre from the 1990 cotton pick, Tandou has grown 70 acres in 1991 and 850 acres in 1992 installing one roller gin to process the 1991 crop and expanding the gin this ...
  • Freney, J.R.; Rochester, I.J.; Constable, , G.A. (1992-08-11)
    Farmers in Australia apply between 80 and 200 kg N ba-1 to cotton, but only part of this nitrogen is taken up and used by the crop, and the remainder is lost :from the plantsoil system. Our work at Narrabri with 15N labelled ...
  • Constable, Greg (1992-08-11)
    In the majority of cases, growers do not have a problem with excessive vegetative growth in their cotton crops. It is more likely that a field is not growing to potential. Factors which have a big bearing on early season ...
  • Constable, Greg; Rochester, Ian (1992-08-11)
    Nitrogen management has to be good for best yields, but factors such as soil condition, irrigation and pest management may have greater effects on cotton yield than N rate. We have had much improved cotton yields in the ...
  • Kruizinga, Jack; Wells, Tony (1992-08-11)
    An experiment was conducted at Narrabri Agricultural Research Station during the 1991-92 season to investigate the response of a range of currently available cotton varieties to irrigation and nitrogen treatments. This ...
  • Buster, Stephen (1992-08-11)
    The question is asked - Why grow Pima in A ustraha? There are different answers. The most obvious is the economic consideration, then there is the challenge of doing something new and different. For the sake of this ...
  • McKenzie, D.C.; Koppi, Tony; McBratney, Alex (1992-08-11)
    This paper discusses recent progress with the refinement of promising methods, both direct and indirect, for measuring the severity of compaction in cracking clays used for irrigated cotton. It should be read in conjunction ...
  • Triantafilis, John; McBratney, Alex (1992-08-11)
    In the arid and semi-arid regions of the world, irrigation has enabled previously unarable tracts of land to be used for a wide variety of agricultural activities. Unfortunately many of these areas have associated with ...
  • Anthony. David (1992-08-11)
    In surface irrigation systems we use beds rather than growing thee crop on the flat for several reasons. The two most important reasons are to assist in the control of water and to avoid water-logging of the cotton; a ...
  • Niles, G.A. (1992-08-11)
    Assessment of cotton fiber quality has undergone a significant change during the past several years. The older, traditional practice of assessing quality by color, trash and preparation has been progressively replaced by ...
  • Worrall, Iain (1992-08-11)
    Macquarie Agribusiness report on the market for Australian raw cotton includes an overview of the Australian and world cotton industry.
  • Gordon, Stuart G.; Leeder, John D.; Steadman, Robert G. (1992-08-11)
    Cotton fibre maturity has several definitions. Synonymous with ripeness, maturity may be that property which increases with the reproductive power of the seed, signalling to the plant that the seed containing part is ready ...
  • Yu, Feng; Barry, T.N.; Moughan, P.J.; Wilson, G.F. (1992-08-11)
    A three year investigation is being undertaken at Massey University to study the effect of condensed tannins, heat and solvent extraction upon the nutritive value of cottonseed meal for ruminant and monogastric farm animals. ...

View more