1998 Australian Cotton Conference

 

Recent Submissions

  • Furbank, Robert; Llewellyn, Danny; Ruan, Yong-Ling (Australian Cotton Growers Research Association, 1998-08-14)
    Despite the great potential for increasing cotton productivity through the genetic engineering of fibre development, little progress has so far been made in this area. This is in sharp contrast to the success of pest and ...
  • Llewellyn, Danny; Dennis, Elizabeth; Lyon, Bruce; Rungis, Danis (Australian Cotton Growers Research Association, 1998-08-14)
    When breeders cross two cotton varieties together there are millions of potential new combinations of genes that are generated in the progeny from the two parent plants. The breeders must then select from amongst these ...
  • Buckerfield, John (Australian Cotton Growers Research Association, 1998-08-14)
    Cotton-trash and feedlot-manure has been processed by composting worms over three months to produce vermicompost, an organic residue reputed to improve soil conditions for plant growth. A paddock-scale trial has been ...
  • Constable, Greg; Stiller, W (Australian Cotton Growers Research Association, 1998-08-14)
    Even though the Australian cotton industry is based on a high input irrigated system, there is an increasingly significant area of dryland cotton. Over the last few years there has been increased interest, by researchers ...
  • Sambell, J; Naylor, G (Australian Cotton Growers Research Association, 1998-08-14)
    CSIRO Wool Technology in Geelong has traditionally focussed on 'post-farm' wool research but is now expanding its activities to include textile related research and development for the wider Australian industry, ...
  • Constable, Greg; Reid, Peter (Australian Cotton Growers Research Association, 1998-08-14)
    The CSIRO breeding program at the Australian Cotton Research Institute at Narrabri aims to develop locally adapted varieties for use by Australian farmers, The program has been very successful in developing varieties for ...
  • Reid, Peter; Constable, Greg; Thompson, N; Mann, G; Heal, L; Tyson, C (Australian Cotton Growers Research Association, 1998-08-14)
    The CSIRO Cotton Cultivar Trial(CCT) has been run cooperatively by CSIRO and DPIQ for 24 years and is used as the last stage in our breeding line evaluation. Early generation testing following single plant selection involves ...
  • Constable, Greg (Australian Cotton Growers Research Association, 1998-08-14)
    CSIRO has had a successful cotton breeding program for over 20 years. In 1996, more than 90% of Australia's cotton was sown to varieties derived from the CSRO breeding program. In the Cotton CRC, the aim is to complement ...
  • Roberts, Grant; Bel-Berger, Patricia (Australian Cotton Growers Research Association, 1998-08-14)
    Neps cause significant financial losses to the textile industry. This paper defines different types of cotton neps, their sources and measurements, and the current state of knowledge about research on neps. Generally, a ...
  • Jeffery, Ray (Australian Cotton Growers Research Association, 1998-08-14)
    It is very important to understand the nature of the phenomena which have been collectively characterised as the 'Asian financial crisis' or the 'Asian meltdown'. I would like to take you through an analysis ...
  • Curran, John (Australian Cotton Growers Research Association, 1998-08-14)
    The Project - A Review of Australian Cotton Classing Standards and perhaps for some, may be even many, of the Australian cotton growers prompting the question - Why? The comment &quote;If it isn't broken why fix ...
  • Corish, Peter (Australian Cotton Growers Research Association, 1998-08-14)
    Marketing, specifically generic marketing, must be one of the linchpins of any strategy to &quote;cover our future&quote;. The fact that generic marketing must be done is a given. It has been recognised as a must for all ...
  • Townsend, Terry (Australian Cotton Growers Research Association, 1998-08-14)
    Cotton's share of world textile fibre consumption is falling and now equals less than 45%, down about five percentage points since 1986 when cotton's share was 50%. While cotton remains the single most important ...
  • Farley, David (Australian Cotton Growers Research Association, 1998-08-14)
    In the race for market share, the cotton industry faces strong competition from chemical fibres. Today, chemical fibres account for more than half the world's consumption of textile fibres, an increase of over 20 per ...
  • Graham, Peter (Australian Cotton Growers Research Association, 1998-08-14)
    Many growers show little or no interest in their cotton once it leaves the farm gate. The only contact they have with their cotton after it leaves the farm is when the merchant, or independent classifier put a value on the ...
  • Pailthorpe, Michael; Allen, Stephen (Australian Cotton Growers Research Association, 1998-08-14)
    Microbial damage to raw cotton, sometimes referred to as weathering damage, is a common event in most parts of the world. Microbes, viz. bacteria and fungi, are omnipresent in the environment. In the case of cotton production, ...
  • Punch, Gary (Australian Cotton Growers Research Association, 1998-08-14)
    In his paper to you, Mike Logan, our youngest Cotton Australia Board Director, said to you, &quote;unless we have the support of the local communities, we are doomed to extinction&quote;. To that I would like to add that ...
  • Schoenfisch, Murray (Australian Cotton Growers Research Association, 1998-08-14)
    (I) To continue and develop the work begun in UsQ6C which focuses on residue handling in back to back cotton and rotation crops while optimising the control of diapausing heliothis pupae. (2) To visit growing areas (irrigated ...
  • Logan, Mike (Australian Cotton Growers Research Association, 1998-08-14)
    The future of agriculture in Australia depends on the type of people who are in the cotton industry. The future depends on a professional & aggressive approach to the business of farming, prepared for change. Looking ...
  • McCleary; Spriggs, Shelly (Australian Cotton Growers Research Association, 1998-08-14)
    The imperatives for a comprehensive training scheme in the cotton industry are easily identifiable: looming skills shortage, new and complex technologies to be adopted, best management practices to be implemented and the ...

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